Posted by Jeff Smith on 2/19/2018

If you're selling a home, having high quality photos is one of the most important things you can do to catch the eye of prospective buyers. Taking great photos, however, is something that requires a combination of frequent practice and knowledge of how your camera works. Sure, these days you can take a decent photo with an iPhone camera and be done with it. While that method is a good start, if you want to progress with your photography you'll eventually have to make the leap to a DSLR where you have more freedom to change exposure settings. I know what you're thinking. High quality photos means spending a ton of money on camera equipment, right? Fortunately, entry level DSLR cameras have become more affordable in recent years. To start taking great photos you'll only need four things: your DSLR camera, a tripod, a wide angle lens, and a place to practice your photography.

Step 1: Setting up

You'll want to set up the room with the right balance of furniture, decorations and natural light. Avoid decorations that are too personal (like family photos) or eccentric (no stuffed animals, preferably). Set up your tripod against one of the walls of the room. Ideally, you'll have the target of your photo illuminated by natural light coming through windows, so you'll likely be standing in front of or next to the windows. However, before you take any photos use your best judgment to determine the room's best angles. The amount of and the placement of furniture will play a large role in how spacious the room looks, but equally important is the camera angle from which you take your photos.

Step 2: Learn your camera settings

You won't learn all of the settings in a DSLR overnight, but it is important to get an understanding of the basics. In spite of the many technical improvements that have been made, the basic concept of a camera hasn't changed much over the years. The two main components that determine what your picture looks like are aperture and shutter speed. Aperture (or "f-stop") is what is used to determine how much light enters the camera. Much like your pupils dilate in the dark to let in as much light as possible, having a wide aperture will allow you to take brighter photos. Shutter speed is the amount of time the shutter on your camera is open. A slower shutter speed allows more light into the camera, creating a brighter exposure. However, due to our inability to hold a camera entirely still having a slower shutter speed creates more opportunity for your photo to become blurred from camera shake. A third important setting is the ISO. This setting is unique to digital photography because it controls the sensitivity of the camera's image sensor. The higher the number, the more sensitive. Why not just crank it up all the way then to get the best quality? Because if you set it too high the photos become grainy or "noisy."

Step 3: Practice

Now that you know the basics, start taking photos in your home using various camera settings. Play around with taking photos with different light sources on, with your camera flash on and off, and at different times of day. You'll find that there are endless possibilities when it comes to taking photos of your home.  

Tags: Real Estate   home  
Categories: real estate   Home   photography  

Posted by Jeff Smith on 10/9/2017

House title search fees, mortgage application fees, mortgage insurance, homeowners insurance, property taxes and homeowners association fees are only a part of the cost of owning a house. There is also the mortgage principal, home appraisal fee, closing costs, home inspection fees and mortgage interest to pay after you buy a house. Facing all of these and other costs takes thought.

Three simple steps to home ownership and lower mortgage payments

By preparing to buy and maintain a house, you could save big over the short and the long term. Get creative and you will see that there are many ways to save for your home. Three simple ways that you can save for your home are to:

  • Open a home savings account. Do this at least two years before you buy a house. Set up an automatic deposit so that money goes into the account each time you receive your payroll check.
  • Use money from your bonus check or tax return to invest in your house down payment. Start doing this early, as soon as you graduate from high school, and you could save several thousand if not tens of thousands of dollars.
  • Work a second job or freelance. Invest all of the earnings from this work into your home savings account. You could sharpen your talents by using these abilities to generate income. For example, if you have design skills, you could start your own web design or marketing design company and use earnings from sales to build a down payment on a house.

Splitting the down payment with another adult you buy a house with is another way to make smart house buys. Hold yourself and other adults who will be living in the house responsible for making their portion of the monthly mortgage. Split house maintenance costs as well.

Get serious about saving money to buy your first house

As soon as you decide to buy a house, start taking steps to save for your home. For example, if you know that you want to buy a house two years after you graduate from college, start saving for a down payment while you're still in college or as soon as you graduate.

Learn how to build and manage a budget. Depending on how disciplined you are, you might benefit from working with a line item budget. If you live at home, slowly work your way up to saving enough each month to cover the mortgage on the type of house you want to buy.

Do this for two years and you could save a healthy down payment on a house. Focus on what it takes to get your monthly mortgage payments down to where they only require 25% or less of your total net income and you be financially comfortable throughout the home buy and maintenance process.

You might even have enough money to add one or more rooms onto your house, increasing the total value of your property. This single step could position you to yield a profit should you decide to sell your house.

Tags: homeowner   home  
Categories: homeowner   real estate